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Creating Unique Soap Molds Out of PVC Pipe 

by Steve Paul

Making unique soap molds out of everyday items is a cinch once you start thinking outside the box. There is definitely no need to buy professional soap making molds when fun and inexpensive alternatives are readily available.

One of my favorite ideas for creating unique soap molds is forming circular soap out of PVC pipe. Not only does it create a great looking finished product, but this soap molding method is also extremely simple to put into practice.

Creating a PVC soap mold requires 5 pieces of equipment which includes: PVC pipe, a cutting board, a funnel, a ladle and freezer paper.

So what are the steps? Once you are ready to pour your initial soap into its mold, place the PVC pipe vertically on the end of the cutting board. Be sure that all the edges are firmly placed against the wood and held there with a decent amount of force. After all, you wouldn't want soap running out of the bottom!

Now place the funnel into the pipes opening for easy pouring. Make absolute sure that you use a funnel made out of silicon or stainless steel as this early stage soap will be extremely caustic and harsh. Never use plastic equipment of any sort. Once the soap has time to cure, the ph levels will drastically change resulting in a mild skin care cleanser, but for now, you need to be a little bit careful.

Next, begin transferring the soap from the pot into the PVC pipe using your ladle. Again, you need to make sure that the scooper is also made out of the proper materials. Never fill the PVC pipe all the way to the brim as the soap will expand during the curing process. I personally recommend that you leave about 3 inches at the top.

Cover the opened area of the PVC pipe with freezer paper using rubber bands to secure it in place. This will help keep the heat trapped inside the mold.

Now it's time to insulate your soap even further. Take old blankets or large towels that you don't mind ruining and thoroughly wrap the outside of the mold. Be as liberal as possible. I recommend using about 7 - 10 towels or 4 blankets. It's important that the heat caused by the soap making reaction dissipates as slowly as possible in order for proper curing to occur.

Patience is crucial for the cold process soap maker as you must now wait about 72 hours for the soap to harden. Keep in mind that once it's hard, it is still too caustic to use as it is not fully cured yet.

Slip the soap out of the PVC pipe and cut it into bars of approximate even width. If you find that removing the soap from this unique soap mold is difficult, you can either use a jar to help push it out or place the soap in the freezer to make it contract.

Lay your new bars on a rack to cure allowing air to circulate around it. Be sure to flip them every few days. After 6 - 8 weeks, you are ready to test PH levels and use your new all natural skin care product!

For more information about other great unique soap molds be sure to visit Steve's website: http://www.soap-making-resource.com. Within this extensive resource you will discover many important soap making tips, tricks, ingredient profiles, equipment reviews and soap making techniques that are a joy to learn about.

Article Source: EzineArticles.com

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